Seeking help around the house

Added: Jack Artis - Date: 04.10.2021 08:15 - Views: 31284 - Clicks: 803

As a carer, you help the person you care for with many activities in and around the home. Understanding what you need to do and what help you can get can make your life easier. As well as juggling all of your day to day tasks, the physical demands of caring can place enormous stress on your body which can lead to exhaustion and injury.

These are just a few practical ideas on safely providing care. For more tips and advice, please go to carergateway. You can change their home to help the person you care for to move around safely. This can be changes to their home if they are still living there, or to your home if they are living with you.

Changes to the home can increase their independence and reduce the risk of injury. This also helps you by increasing the range of things the person can do for themselves, and by reducing your risk of injury. You can ask your doctor or occupational therapist about what changes to the home might help you.

Changes should be done by a d builder or tradesperson. You can also visit the Home Modifications Information Clearinghouse website for more information. Creating a safe environment for you and the person that you care for can be challenging, but taking the time to identify potential risks can reduce the likelihood of a serious accident or injury. Simple home modifications can be made by you or a service provider to help eliminate hazards, improve accessibility and reduce accidents.

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For larger home modifications you may need to contact a service provider. These are just a few tips that may help you understand how to make your home a safer place. So have a look around the home for ways you can improve safety and reduce potential hazards. For more information and additional advice, please go to carergateway. Alarms and monitors can help you by sending information about the person you care for directly to you or others.

Alarms send an alert in an emergency or as a reminder. For example, the person you care for could have:. For example, the person you care for may have:. Talk with your doctor about what might help you and the person you care for. You can also talk with:. You may be able to get financial help with alarms and monitors. Carer Gateway call and My Aged Care call can tell you more about the home help you can get.

Eating the right food can help to keep you and the person you care for healthy. The Eat for health website has more information about healthy eating and meal planning, and Carers NSW offers advice on healthy food for busy people. People with a medical condition and older people sometimes need to follow a special diet. For example, if the person you care for has:.

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It is important to make sure the person you care for is getting enough nutrition. It is also important to allow them to be as independent as possible during meals. If the person you care for finds it hard to eat or swallow, you might need to prepare foods that are softer or in smaller bites. An occupational therapist can help you figure out the best way to make and serve food and to help the person eat. Supplements can help people get the vitamins, minerals and calories they need. Talk with your doctor before you give supplements to the person you care for.

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If the person finds it hard to eat by themselves, you may need special equipment to make eating easier for them. For example, you could consider:. For more information on eating aids, visit Independent Living Centres Australia or call As a carer, you may need to help the person you care for to move around.

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For example, you may need to move them from a bed to a wheelchair, or in and out of a car. It is very important that you learn how to do this properly to prevent injuries, either to yourself or to the person you care for. You should protect your back, arms and neck when you move the person. Bend your knees when lifting someone from a low position, keep your back upright and stand by straightening your knees. Tell the person you care for when and where you are going to move them, so they can help as much as possible to take the strain off you.

You will need to decide if you are strong enough to move and lift the person, or if you will need help. You may need to get another person to help. You can ask your doctor or other health care professional for advice and training on how to move someone. Many carer organisations train carers in how to move and lift people. There is also information available online, such as this guide to techniques for moving and handling people. You can also get special equipment to help you move and lift someone, such as hoists, stand aids and slide sheets. You might be able to get free or subsidised cheaper for you equipment.

Always ask a health professional about how to use equipment to prevent injury to yourself and the person you care for. Find out what changes to your home might help you on the Home Modifications Information Clearinghouse website. Find out what equipment and services you can get on the Independent Living Centres Australia website, or call If you are caring for someone with disability, visit the National Disability Insurance Scheme NDIS website to see what support they can get, or call If you are caring for an older person, visit the My Aged Care website to see what help they can get, or call Provide feedback.

You are here: Home Help and advice At home. At home 11 minute read. Add to read later View my read later list. Video duration The following ideas may help: Develop a schedule and get into a good routine. If the person you care for has reduced mobility allow plenty of time to get from A to B. Create a safe and secure environment. Look out for hazards such as loose rugs and clutter which may limit movement around the house. Install hand support rails along staircases, near toilets, and in the shower or near a handbasin.

Take care when moving objects or the person you care for. Let the person you are caring for know where and when you are going to move them, so they can assist as much as possible to take the strain off you. Bend your knees when lifting something or someone from a low position, keep your back upright and stand by straightening your knees.

Always seek assistance from a health professional about the use of equipment or moving and handling aids before you use them to prevent injury to yourself and the person you care for. These may include: installing grab rails near a toilet or hand supports, in the shower or near a handbasin constructing handrails on stairs, or defining the edges of the stairs by using non slip strips. Have you thought about Talking with other carers about your experiences Getting financial help for aids and equipment Getting financial help if the person you care for has disability Talking with your employer about what support they can give you.

Help and advice Call Carer Gateway on to find out what help is available in your area. Helpful links Find out what changes to your home might help you on the Home Modifications Information Clearinghouse website. Website feedback If you have feedback on the site, we'd love to hear from you.

Seeking help around the house

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